Shalom Moskovitz

Israeli (1887–1980)

About the artist:

Shalom Moskovitz was an Hasidic Jewish painter in Safed, Israel. Moskovitz, known as artist Shalom of Safed, labored as a watchmaker for most of his life before first beginning to paint at the age 55.

His art primarily featured biblical themes and often contained a proverb or sentence from scripture. His paintings are considered significant to Israeli art history. Shalom Moskovitz was born in Safed, c 1887. He was Hasidic and influenced by mystical tradition of the Cabbala that like Moskovitz also had its home in Safed. He earned a living as a watchmaker and was commonly referred to by that name, "Zeigermacher", in Yiddish. During the Israeli war for independence his workshop was destroyed. This forced him to try to try earning a living from making toys from plywood.

In the 1950's, painter Yosl Bergner chose to reside in Safed. Bergner encountered wood toys and impressed with the craftsmanship, inquired as to their creator. He was introduced to Moskovitz and encouraged the watchmaker to try painting; even supplying him with painting supplies. Thus began, Shalom Moskovitz second career as an artist. While Moskovitz's profession shifted to painting, his surrounding remained constant. He continued to live and paint in the city of Safed until his death there in 1980.

Moskovitz was a naïve artist. He painted in the primitive style, expressing biblical themes. He also designed stained-glass windows and was an accomplished practitioner of microcalligraphy. His art has been featured at Stedelijk of Amsterdam and the Kunsthous of Zurich. A painting, "Noah's Ark" (1965) is included in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art in New York City.[4] An exhibition of his work was held at the Jewish Museum of New York in 1980. Also in 1980, Elie Wiesel wrote a book with Moskovitz's art titled "Images from the Bible: the paintings of Shalom of Safed, the words of Elie Wiesel (with Shalom of Safed). Moskovitz was featured in the 1988 film "Shalom of Safed – The Innocent Eye of a Man of Galilee" co-written by Daniel Doron.

Shalom Moskovitz

Israeli (1887–1980)

( works)

About the artist:

Shalom Moskovitz was an Hasidic Jewish painter in Safed, Israel. Moskovitz, known as artist Shalom of Safed, labored as a watchmaker for most of his life before first beginning to paint at the age 55. His art primarily featured biblical themes and

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